Beneficiary Update

Below are links for the various beneficiary update forms:

Traditional, ROTH, SEP, SIMPLE IRAs (Click Here)

You will need to complete this form for each IRA you and/or your spouse have.  If you name a trust as the beneficiary, you will also need to complete the Trust Certification Form (Click Here).

Profit Sharing Plan, Money Purchase Pension, 401k (Click Here)

You will need to complete this form for each plan you and/or your spouse have.  If you name a trust as the beneficiary, you will also need to complete the Trust Certification Form (Click Here).

Annuities:

You will need to complete the form below for each annuity you and/or your spouse have:

Any other annuity or insurance policy you may have, please contact us at 215-665-6232 or email us at stedmarkservice@janney.com and we will provide the proper documents.

Resources:

Beneficiary Designations - A beneficiary designation is one form of will substitute. It allows you to transfer certain assets, such as the proceeds of a life insurance policy or a retirement plan (e.g., an IRA, 401(k), or 403(b)), without going through probate. The person or entity you choose to receive the proceeds is called a beneficiary. If you're single, you can choose anyone you wish as the beneficiary. If you're married, the law may restrict your choice. You can also name a charitable institution, your estate, or a trust as the beneficiary of many retirement plans. Read more.

Beneficiary Designations for Roth IRAs - When you establish a Roth IRA, you're generally required to complete a beneficiary designation form with your Roth IRA custodian or trustee. The beneficiary (or beneficiaries) you name will receive the remaining funds in your Roth IRA after you die. Although choosing a beneficiary may seem straightforward, there are actually several tax and nontax points to consider--and the beneficiary decisions you make now may have significant consequences in the future. Read more.

Annuity Beneficiary Considerations - If you are the owner but not the annuitant, you may want to name yourself as the beneficiary. The beneficiary receives the death benefits (or continuing annuity payments) when the annuitant dies. Thus, if the annuitant dies before you do, you may want the death proceeds to revert to you. You should consider having a contingent beneficiary in addition to you, the owner, as the primary beneficiary. If you, the owner, die, you may want the death proceeds to go to the contingent beneficiary instead of your estate. Read more